Saint Sulpice le Dunois
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Saint Sulpice le Dunois

Located in the heart of the “Valley of the two Creuses”, Saint-Sulpice-le-Dunois is a rural commune with a hilly territory (lowest point 218 meters, highest point 546 meters) which extends from the Creuse River to the Bois de Chabanne. The Commune has forty hamlets which group together most of its population.

Bourg, Eglise Saint-Sulpice-de-Bourges

Placed under the vocation of St. Sulpice, the building dates back to the 12th century (nave and choir) and was subject to later remodeling, particularly in the 14th and 15th centuries when it was fortified addition of buttresses at the chevet and a square bell tower (it is one of the few examples of this type dated to the 14th century). Chapels were also added in the 15th and 16th centuries as well as a sacristy in the 18th century (now dismantled). Listed as a Historic Monument in 1994, the church was fully restored between 2005 and 2008.

Eglise Saint Sulpice Le Dunois

Eglise Saint Sulpice Le Dunois

Le Mas Saint-Jean, Chapelle

The chapel, placed under the vocation of Saint John the Baptist, was formerly called the chapel of Mas-Chabot. It was the property of the priory of Aureuil in Limousin, which named the holders there and whose cartulary allows to attest its existence from the beginning of the 12th century. The chapel would be the only remaining building of the feudal castle called La Bastide, which was in the 15th century the property of Jean de Brosse, companion of Joan of Arc. Legend has it that she came to pray there around 1430 at the instigation of Jean de Brosse.

Chapelle Du Mas Saint Jean 1

Chapelle Du Mas Saint Jean 1

Bourg, Auberge de la Fontaine au Loup

This inn is a former mansion from the 18th century. It belonged to the Merle de la Brugière de Laveaucoupet family, of which General Sylvain-François Jules Merle de Laveaucoupet (1806-1892) was a member, who was mayor of the commune from 1871 to 1878. The building was bought in 1989 by the commune which decided in 1997 to rehabilitate it as an inn. After the work inherent in the rehabilitation, the Auberge de la Fontaine au Loup opened its doors in 2002.

Auberge De La Fontaine Au Loup

Auberge De La Fontaine Au Loup

La Barde, Castle

Attested as early as 1422, the castle was at the time owned by the lords of the fief, Olive and Nignons de la Barde. A document from 1578 describes the chateau as a modest building with one floor and attic space. In 1695, it belonged to Jeanne Bertrand, lady of Plaix, and Etienne de la Celle. From the 18th century, it seems that it was no longer continuously inhabited. The last known lord was Léonard-François Merle de la Brugière. Following the Revolution, the fief was probably dispersed and sold as a national asset. The cadastral plan of 1825 indicates that the present residence was not yet built: it is a mansion built after the first quarter of the 19th century and shows no remains of the castle.

La Barde, Chateau

La Barde, Chateau

Le Chézeau, Château

A fiefdom is attested at Le Chézeau from the early 18th century, when it belonged to the de la Loue family. After the Revolution, it became the property of the Du Breuil de Souvolle family, who had the castle rebuilt during the second quarter of the 19th century. The house was then enlarged and transformed into a mansion by Mr. Astier, probably at the end of the 19th century: two wings were added to the central building. The property then became the seat of a farm.

Le Chezeau, Chateau

Le Chezeau, Chateau

Souvolles, Castle

The castle and lordship of Souvolle belonged from the 14th century to a branch of the de la celle family. The latter remained the owner until the marriage, in 1708, of the heiress Anne de la Celle to Charles du Breuilh who took the title of “lord of the Breuil de Souvolle”. The family of the latter remained the owner of the domain until the Revolution. A census of 1626 mentions a square tower, three round towers, one of which served as a dovecote, and a chapel (destroyed). The castle was remodeled in the 19th century, which is why it has not retained all of its original elements and is now assimilated to a mansion.

Souvolles, Chateau

Souvolles, Chateau

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